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Published: Sunday, 8/25/2013 - Updated: 7 months ago

Kingston puts its $10 million rehab center into use

BY MATT THOMPSON
BLADE STAFF WRITER
Neil Nieckarz,  director of rehabilitation at Kingston in Perrysburg, shows off the new rehabilitation facility. Neil Nieckarz, director of rehabilitation at Kingston in Perrysburg, shows off the new rehabilitation facility.
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Kingston Healthcare has opened opened a $10-million, 55,000-square foot rehabilitation center in Perrysburg next to its assisted living center.

The new center had its first patient last week, someone from its 89-room Kingston Residence on the same campus. The new three-story building at 333 E. Boundary St. has a salon, bistro, offices, and physical therapy room on the first floor; 30 rooms and a dining room on the second floor; and a third floor to open in October.

The rehabilitation center is for short-term care, from a week to 60 days, for people that have had surgery or were in an accident and need physical therapy and rehab to get to full strength and return home. Offered are physical, occupational, speech, aquatic, and outpatient therapy, as well as wellness programs for the community.

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The physical therapy room is 5,000-square feet, and it has a warm, salt-water pool to help with therapy and ease motion rehab. There are stairs, jets, handlebars and a full lift to place a patient into the water.

A rehab center was built as part of the Kingston Residence of Perrysburg. A rehab center was built as part of the Kingston Residence of Perrysburg.
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"We have a state of the art physical therapy room. It is enormous," said Neil Nieckarz, physical therapist for the center. "What differentiates us is we do one-on-one treatment and if a patient has an 8 a.m. therapy appointment, the family knows about it, (and) the nurses know to give them more pain medication before in case it is a knee replacement or a painful injury."

The center will have 62 beds and create 100 jobs for full time and part time workers.

The center will accept patients over the age of 18.

When Christine Blackmore, the rehabilitation center's administrator, said Kingston was designing it, it took into consideration typical things patients don't like about such centers --  food, care time, and smell.

"They have dine-in on their floor with a menu style restaurant," she said. "That is their social gathering."

As for care time, when a patient calls for assistance, a staff member is paged, and if three minutes go by with no response, every nurse on the floor is paged. If no one has responded after another three minutes,  the administration staff is paged.

"My preference is to have them cared for in five minutes," Ms. Blackmore said.

The bad odor in care centers, she said, is typically from dirty linens being around. Ms. Blackmore said a laundry shoot has been installed to remove such linen from the floor.



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