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Published: Saturday, 11/2/2013 - Updated: 8 months ago

Mercy opens 24-hour emergency room in Perrysburg

BY MATT THOMPSON
BLADE STAFF WRITER
The new  Mercy Medical Center opens Monday and has an emergency room, 12 beds, and a diagnostic center. The new Mercy Medical Center opens Monday and has an emergency room, 12 beds, and a diagnostic center.
THE BLADE/KATIE RAUSCH Enlarge | Buy This Photo

Perrysburg will have its first 24-hour emergency room on Monday.

That's when the $13.6-million Mercy Medical Center opens at 7 a.m. It will have an emergency room, though it's not connected to a hospital, that has 12 beds and a nursing station. Also, the building will have a diagnostic center with a room for x-rays, sensory mammogram testing room, sensory CT scan room, and a sensory MRI exam room. It expects to have up to 20,000 patients a year.

The center, which is to begin accepting patients at 7 a.m. Monday, is at 12621 Eckel Junction Rd., near State Rt. 25 and I-475/U.S. 23. It is across the expressway from a 24-hour clinic which ProMedica opened a month ago in its medical office building in Levis Commons.

PHOTO GALLERY: Click here for more photos from inside the new center

The Mercy free-standing emergency room has an open house today from 2 to 4 p.m. to allow residents to look at the facility and equipment.

Dr. Chris Goliver, medical director for the Mercy facility, said Mercy decided on Perrysburg because of the need for an emergency room in northern Wood County. Dr. Goliver said it seemed to be needed, given the population density in the area.

The Mercy Medical Center has a diagnostic center with X-ray, MRI, and CT scan equipment. The Mercy Medical Center has a diagnostic center with X-ray, MRI, and CT scan equipment.
THE BLADE/KATIE RAUSCH Enlarge | Buy This Photo

He is "coming home," as he had been a Perrysburg firefighter in the 1980s and 1990s . When he took a physiology test to become deputy chief, the fire chief said his results matched those of a physician and suggested he go to medical school.

The center has colorful waiting rooms and different themes for each emergency bed room. A sports theme with photo is in one room where someone with a sprained ankle from soccer might go. The two children's rooms have a photograph of child that is captioned, "Standing up to bullying." Each of the rooms has a TV.

"We're trying to meet our patients needs," Dr. Goliver said. "It is designed to put the patients at ease. We tried to create a calming and relaxing environment."

One room is designated for people that may be vomiting or have diarrhea, and it has a connected bathroom.

The trauma room is next to the ambulance entrance, which has helicopter pad. It has resuscitation equipment for the physicians the stabilize the patient.  

The diagnostics center also is designed to try to relax patients who may be nervous about being testing. The mammogram testing rooms allows patient to select the smells and color themes on an iPad before entering the room. During the testing, there are two screens to look at based on the theme and colors chosen by the patient.

In the room with the CT scan, there is a screen for cartoons for children, and lighting that can change to calmer colors. In the MRI room is the same lighting theme, and the magnet for the MRI has a wood panel surrounding it to make it appear less daunting. Depending on what body part will be screen, the patient may be able to go into the machine feet first.

"A lot of the claustrophobia is from being in head first," said Sandy Michalski manager of imaging services for the center. "The MRI is not pleasant being squashed in a tunnel."  

The room also has a screen that could show fish or an African safari theme to help the patient relax. 

The diagnostics center also has a portable X-ray machine, in case patients can't make it to the room. 

The goal at the medical center, Dr. Goliver said, is that each patient should have no more than a 15-minute wait. The center has a staff of 50 full-time and part-time employees along with the eight physicians. At any time day or night, there will be someone at reception, radiology, and the lab, plus nurses and physicians. 

"The services at our emergency room are the same you can expect at a community hospital," Dr. Goliver said. "We just don't have the hospital behind us. If a patient requires admission, we'd facilitate it."

He said this is the only free-standing emergency room in northwest Ohio. He said it is going to be a thing of the future for the medical field, citing there are more than 70 in Texas and 300 in America.

The medical center will display art from Perrysburg High School students, one of the ways the center is trying to partner with the community. The center also is holding educational health sessions at Way Public Library.

Contact Matt Thompson at: mthompson@theblade.com, 419-356-8786, or on Twitter at @mthompson25.



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