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Published: Sunday, 8/4/2013

Gun, fire safety taught at 3-day Heroes Camp

BY MATT THOMPSON
BLADE STAFF WRITER
McComb police officer Evan Ramge demonstrates the skill of handcuffing on volunteer Cole Anthony, 12, at Heroes Camp. McComb police officer Evan Ramge demonstrates the skill of handcuffing on volunteer Cole Anthony, 12, at Heroes Camp.
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McComb police officer Evan Ramge, surrounded by a group of students, lifted his arms, aimed, and pulled the trigger on Wednesday at Owens Community College.

It was part of a "Heroes Camp" training session at the Perrysburg Township college. He was shooting an air-soft gun at a target and teaching the 10 students, ages 12 to 17, the fundamentals of how to stand, hold the gun, use the double-safety, and sight in the target. 

Wednesday was law enforcement training on day two of a three at Heroes Camp. Tuesday, students learned about the emergency medical services, and today a local firetruck will permit lessons about fire safety.

Overall, the camp had 32 children, split in groups from 8 to 11 and from 12 to 17. The fee for the camp was $130.

"I'm really looking forward to shooting the air-soft gun," said Emily Tajblik before she took aim.

The 13-year-old Genoa student said she loves to hunt and enjoys being around guns. She wasn't interested in becoming a police officer, EMS worker, or firefighter. She said her mom just signed her up for the camp but she's enjoying it.

McComb police officer Evan Ramge teaches about police officer guns. McComb police officer Evan Ramge teaches about police officer guns.
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Cole Anthony, 12, from Elmore, attended a different reason. His father is a firefighter and he said he wants to help society.

"I want to go into law enforcement, I've always liked guns," he said. "I want to grow up and be in law enforcement and be a server of the U.S."

His favorite part of the camp was the bomb squad when it detonated a string bomb. He said he also learned how the experts defuse bombs. The bomb squad also showed off its robot that puts explosives into a container made of the metal used on a submarine, according to the young Anthony.

On Tuesday at the camp, students faced fears of rappelling down a multiple-story wall inside a large vehicle bay at the Center for Emergency Preparedness at Owens.

"It was the craziest thing I've done," said 15-year-old Evan Meyers. "I was holding on to the line and hit a metal cabinet before going and I slipped and saw my life flash before my eyes."

Even some younger campers participated in the rappelling. 

"It was scary when you're up on the edge, but you get the hang of it," said Trevor Jensen, 9, from Monclova Township. "Not a lot of people did it -- some of the older kids chickened out."

Contact Matt Thompson at: mthompson@theblade.com, 419-356-8786, or on Twitter at @mthompson25.



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